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Editor-in-chief to leave newspaper after seven years in charge

paul brackleyA regional editor who was recently promoted following a company takeover is leaving his role after seven years in charge.

Paul Brackley, left, editor of the Cambridge News since 2008, is to leave the paper on Friday.

The move comes two months after Paul was named as editor-in-chief for the Central and East region in TM’s new editorial structure.

His is the most senior editorial departure to occur since Trinity Mirror’s £220m takeover of the News’s former parent company Local World last November.

Paul joined the Hertfordshire Mercury as a trainee reporter in 2000 on the Royston and Buntingford edition, progressing to news editor for the Mercury series and then editor before joining the News.

It is understood that Paul does not have a new job to go to.

Said Paul: “I have had a fantastic 16 years with these titles and it has been a pleasure and an honour to edit the Mercury series and the Cambridge News.

“We have made terrific progress both in print and online and I have met many wonderful, hard-working and talented people during my time here. I would like to wish the team all the best for the future.”

Regional managing director for Central & East Richard Duxbury added: “I would like to thank Paul for his hard work and commitment over the years and wish him all the best for the future.”

Andy Veale, who joined the news as deputy editor in 2014 having previously edited the Hunts Post for eight years, has been appointed acting editor while a replacement is recruited.

Staff were told of Paul’s forthcoming departure after being called to a meeting yesterday afternoon.

One Cambridge News staffer, who did not wish to be named, paid tribute to his work as editor and expressed shock at his departure.

He told HTFP: “Paul was the hardest working man in the office, and undoubtedly the hardest working editor I have ever come across.

“He would call stories in when he was on holiday and regularly make improvements and tweaks to online copy into the early hours. This flies in the face of all the time and effort he has put in over many years.”

15 comments

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  • April 13, 2016 at 3:23 pm
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    Some years ago I was very happy indeed to be in the final three on the shortlist for the editorship of the Cambridge (Evening) News. The inferview panels were very hush-hush and if I remember correctly were held on the same day at the posh RAC Club in London. Just two days later the news editor (I was deputy ed) of my then evening paper asked me how the interview went. It was supposed to be confidential so I was shocked! He revealed his sources: the then chief photographer at Cambridge discovered when and where the final interviews were being held and somehow managed to get access to a room in the building opposite the RAC Club. He then showed his pics to his colleagues and sent them (before email!) to various contacts. Needless to say all three candidates were quickly outed. I didn’t get the job in the end but some years later I became ‘owned’ by the CN group when they bought the paper I was editing!!

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  • April 13, 2016 at 4:09 pm
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    Coming to HTFP soon presumably the news of the almighty editorial carve-up being perpetrated by the intelligentsia in this neck of the woods.

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  • April 13, 2016 at 4:24 pm
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    Am I getting older or do we have ourselves a Doogie Howser situation here?

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  • April 13, 2016 at 5:03 pm
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    A theme I’m sure we will see across the industry this year either through titles being swallowed up or ‘ merged’ (as they say) with the parent company staff being favoured over the other or through ‘centralisation’ eg; merged companies finding they have multiple staff doing the same job roles so seeing this as a cost saving.

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  • April 13, 2016 at 6:55 pm
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    Agree ex pat however in my experience they usually get rid of the wrong one and keep the cut price option, seen it so many times in both editorial and advertising.

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  • April 14, 2016 at 9:14 am
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    You could fill a football stadium with discarded editors from the last few years.
    Where do they all go?

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  • April 14, 2016 at 9:27 am
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    Bring back John Deex – from Australia.

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  • April 14, 2016 at 10:22 am
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    They usually go on to bigger and better things in the local independent publishing sector @enough is enough,but not as editors, thats becoming an outdated role and of little value in the modern commercial media world and of lesser value to an employer than good journalists with good contacts and the ability to produce quality copy/ content.

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  • April 14, 2016 at 10:36 am
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    When editors walk/ are pushed before retiring most do so either with a redundo package or compromise agreement (one of those legally binding documents where in return for £XYZ the leaving exec agrees not to divulge what went on behind closed doors and often not to work for named rival organisations for a negotiated set time).
    In many cases they have fallen on their swords over proposed editorial changes they believe will damage the papers and websites, so refuse to implement them. Even so, some employees envy editors over pay-offs which are nowhere near as fabulous as they imagine – they shouldn’t, as leaving a job you’ve loved does hurt.
    Usually it’s enough to let you catch your breath for two or three months. And take one of those holidays you never had time for previously.
    Some eventually take up new roles in regional press (self harm, I call it, as the cycle tends to repeat itself unless you find work in a smallish group that manages not to be swallowed up by constantly restructuring big beasts).
    For others it’s on to PR, charities, local government, magazines or, if you are lucky, specialist publications in a particular interest. The pay is often well below your previous salary; but minimal stress, improved working conditions and sensible hours combine into a big ‘bonus’.
    If you can afford it, the crafty route is to shine in your new job (it’s easy for good editors) but to make sure you are never promoted!

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  • April 14, 2016 at 1:14 pm
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    I think the non-tribute from Mr Duxbury (a man who closes perfectly good newspapers for no good reason) speaks volumes here. Going into Local World was the worst thing Iliffe ever did.

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  • April 14, 2016 at 1:23 pm
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    Yes, Taffia. The carve-up – or integration project, as our masters would have it – can’t be far away. We’ve seen a number of editorial staff (I think it’s seven) leave already this year, none of whom have been replaced. Can’t say it bodes well for the future.

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  • April 14, 2016 at 2:09 pm
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    What’s that saying in football?” The only thing a manager can guarantee is that he will get fired”
    That’s also becoming more and more the case with editors,and certainly if you have the word ‘manager’ in your job title and your company’s being taken over or revenues aren’t looking good I’d be very wary

    Cost savings are easy to make with seemingly non essential staff

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