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Liverpool John Moores University

Liverpool John Moores University Logo

Courses

MA International Journalism

 

MA Journalism

 

BA (hons) Journalism

 

BA (hons) Journalism and Digital Cultures

 

BA (hons) International Journalism

Liverpool is a lively city with a character all of its own and a history and culture that is unmatched outside London. It is an ideal place in which to study journalism. A daily and evening paper, a number of weeklies, radio stations, Granada TV, the BBC and countless PR companies and other media outlets gives it a media feel.

The staff at LJMU are all journalists and share considerable experience of both journalism and teaching. They cover a wide range of professional disciplines including print, radio TV and online. Several are leading researchers or authors in their fields and this is reflected in their teaching. Journalism in LJMU has a good record for its research and it is this balance of research in journalism and teaching that helps make LJMU distinctive.

The school has up to date newsrooms using industry standard equipment and software for radio and TV.

LJMU believes that for students to get a good experience of journalism, there should be a limit to the number of students on a course. Access to staff and equipment is very important in journalism when students are often working against tight deadlines. Only 20 students are allowed to join our International Journalism course each year and we limit the numbers on the Journalism course to 40 a year. This means that all students get good access to our newsrooms and other studios.

BA (hons) Journalism

The BA (Hons) Journalism programme is vocational, developing in students the specialist skills of the journalist together with an understanding of the practice of journalism through knowledge of critical theory and historical and contemporary contexts. It combines production practice with information technology, law, ethics and media theory to produce a course that meets the needs of the journalism industry.

The BA (Hons) Journalism programme aims to produce graduates who have:

  • Specialist skills in print, radio, TV and online journalism with one of these developed to professional levels;
  • Practical journalistic and intellectual skills which enable them to communicate effectively through media technologies;
  • Research skills at degree level evidenced by a research dissertation;
  • The ability to situate the study of Journalism within the broader debates in media and cultural theory;
  • The capability to both initiate ideas and work as a member of a team;
  • A self-sufficiency and determination in presenting themselves for employment as staff or freelancers in the journalism industry;
  • To provide an educational experience which facilitates the development of all students irrespective of race, gender, physical ability and sexual orientation.
    .

    Year One:
    Introduction to News writing
    Introduction to reporting

    Semester One:
    Introduction to Shorthand
    Approaches to Journalism
    Studying Journalism

    Semester Two:
    Intro to law and Ethics
    Journalism History
    Intermediate Shorthand

    .

    Modules

    Introduction to News Writing – To develop in students a thorough grasp of news-writing as required by local newspapers and other entry level media employers.

    Introduction to Reporting – A hands-on course covering everyday activities in the media. You will attend courts and council and learn how to interview and source a variety of types of story.

    Introduction to Shorthand – To develop the skill of shorthand as an aid to accurate note-taking.

    Approaches to Journalism – To introduce you to the news-oriented media in the UK and to help you evaluate how this is structured.

    Studying Journalism – To introduce you to understand methods of teaching and learning in Higher education to enable you to get the best from your studies whether that be lectures, seminars or private study.

    Introduction to Law and Ethics – This module will look at the philosophical issues underpinning the practice of journalism including objectivity, bias, truth and accuracy and how these are converted into laws and codes of ethics.

    Journalism History – To introduce you to the history of journalism, allowing you to place present practice in the context of centuries of development.

    Intermediate Shorthand – To improve your speed at shorthand to aid the taking of accurate notes for reporting.

    .

    Year Two:
    Learning Outcomes –

    Reporting UK Politics (24 credits)
    Advanced Law and Ethics
    Intro to Radio AND Introduction to Online
    Introduction to TV AND introduction to Print production

    Semester One:
    Public Relations

    Semester Two:
    Academic research

    .

    Modules

    Public Relations- To introduce you to the specialist skills used in public relations.

    Reporting Uk Politics – To acquaint you with major political institutions at European, national and local level and to encourage a critical awareness of news-gathering processes and their relationships to broader economic and political issues.

    Advanced Law and Ethics – You will gain knowledge and understanding of humans rights, law and codes of ethical practice as they effect the media and journalists in the UK . You will be able to critically analyse problems of law and ethics and present appropriate solutions.

    Intro to Radio & Online- To introduce you to practical radio journalism and techniques in studio and in location. & To introduce you to the production process employed in electronic publishing, particularly on the world wide web, and to produce pages that are suitable for publication on a website.

    Introduction to TV & Print Production- To introduce you to practical TV journalism and techniques in studio and in location. & To enable you to learn the principles and demonstrate the methods used in production journalism including the practice of sub-editing and design using industry-standard computer equipment.

    Academic Research – To introduce you to academic research, its methodologies and methods. To develop your understanding of the importance of designing meaningful research questions and investigating them with methods that attempt to be both valid and reliable.

    .

    Year Three:
    Learning Outcomes:
    Dissertation

    Semester One:
    Advanced Journalism Practice
    Careers and Freelance
    Advanced Writing Skills

    Semester Two:
    Journalism Final Project
    Journalism Regulation
    Cont Issues in Journalism

    .

    Modules:

    Dissertation – To allow you to reflect on an aspect of the practice of journalism whilst developing your knowledge and appreciation of academic research methods and methodologies; to demonstrate an understanding of key theoretical, conceptual and methodological issues; to demonstrate an ability to apply these in research; to gather, synthesise and make use of relevant literature

    Advanced Journalism Practice – You will synthesise your skills of writing, reporting and production by building on previous practice in one discipline (radio, print, online or TV) in a newsroom environment to develop your creativity and ability to work within a team.

    Careers and Freelance – To give you a clearer understanding of how to build a career in journalism and introduce you to the concept of freelance working and its special requirements.

    Advanced Writing Skills – To interrogate, analyse and practice advanced writing skills in journalism .

    Contemporary Issues in Journalism – To examine professional practices and ideologies, journalism in the public and private spheres and impacts of info technology on the journalism product.

    Journalism Regulation – You will be introduced to media regulation in the UK , Europe and the US . You will analyse and evaluate the performance of the UK regulatory bodies and public service and ownership regulation and consider the widening development of international regulation as well as consider other forms of regulation of the media.

    Journalism Final Project – To allow you to build on work in semester one of year three and at previous levels to advance your factual, news-oriented journalism in one particular subject discipline to approach or match professional standards. Includes a four-week of work placement.

    Applying to LJMU for BA (hons) Journalism

    Journalism at LJMU is very popular, with large numbers of students seeking to apply. The Journalism course aims to fit students to become journalists working in TV, radio, print or online in the UK . The course is structured so that students get a chance to try all four disciplines in the first two years, before specialising in year three.

    This allows students to experience different disciplines before specialising in the one of their choice. Some courses force students to specialise from the start and some try to teach all disciplines throughout the full three years, but LJMU journalists believe that there has to be flexibility of approach and specialisation in order to allow students to become truly proficient.

    The course is a degree course and so provides more than just vocational training. Although it is expected that the majority of graduates will want to work in journalism, the course is structured to provide a strong liberal arts education.

    Students applying direct from school will normally be expected to have passed three A2 A-levels at at least grade C. Students with BTECs, NVQs and City and Guild qualifications will be considered.

    Students who have already studied an HND in Journalism or media production are also welcome to apply, and may be offered direct entry to year two. Only students seeking to transfer from another undergraduate journalism programme would be considered for direct entry into year three.

    Mature students may not need formal qualifications, depending on their age and past history and should contact LJMU direct.

    All applicants will be asked to write an essay and complete a general knowledge and current affairs quiz. Some may be asked to come for interview. for further information, please contact:

    Julie Quine – Admissions & Information Officer,

    School of Media,

    Critical & Creative Arts,

    Liverpool JMU

    BA (hons) Journalism and digital cultures

    The programme is a three year, full time honours programme run within the Liverpool Screen School and has been developed by the department of journalism from its existing range of highly vocational journalism courses to provide an option for students who wanted to study journalism on a course that develops generic journalism skills alongside a more reflective and critical approach.

    It is aimed at students who wish to learn about journalism and even learn how to practice journalism but who do not necessarily want to become journalists, or at least not on the traditional platforms of newspapers or broadcast.

    A number of students who apply for the journalism programme have been identified as likely to find a course of this sort more suited to their needs.

    The programme is vocational in that it aims to develop the learner’s understanding and knowledge of the practice of journalism in the UK as well as developing intellectual skills of effective communication through media technologies, research skills and the ability to situate the study of journalism within the broader debates of global media.

    However, it is not intended to turn out fully trained journalists capable of taking up work directly in journalism although many graduates may have sufficient craft skills as well as understanding of journalism to be able to start work in a number of journalism related positions.

    Candidates will be expected to have at least three A2 levels with grades of D or above. Similar expectations are made of students studying BTEC; Irish Learning Certificate; Scottish Highers or GNVQ.

    Students whose educational qualifications are unusual, or are predicted to fall below the normal acceptance level but who show potential to benefit from the course in line with the university’s mission statement may be invited to interview (this is usually carried out by phone because of the travel difficulties for students from abroad).

    The department has excellent contacts with the industry in Merseyside and beyond. It is a Skillset Digital Academy and the BBC, which is in the process of moving some of its key departments to Salford, has chosen to form a partnership with the Liverpool Screen School that will be highly advantageous to students. Commercial radio stations in the area are also in the process offsetting up partnerships.

    Good working relationships exist with many of the local newspapers so that students have no trouble getting work placements.

    Course leader: Prof. Chris Frost

    Email: c.p.frost@ljmu.ac.uk

    Liverpool John Moores University
    Liverpool Screen School
    Liverpool Digital
    Edge Lane
    Liverpool
    L1 2TZ
    United Kingdom
    Telephone: 0151 231 2121
    Email: c.p.frost@livjm.ac.uk

    www.ljmu.ac.uk/

    BA (hons) International Journalism

    The BA (Hons) International Journalism programme is vocational and aims to develop in students specialist skills in journalism together with an understanding of the practice of journalism through knowledge of critical theory and historical and contemporary contexts. It combines production practice with information technology, law and media theory to produce a course that is aimed at meeting the needs of the journalism industry.

    The International Journalism programme at JMU is the first such course in the UK to integrate rigorous training in journalism skills with a systematic academic study of international relations that is relevant to the work of mainstream news organisations around the world.

    The programme is designed specifically for international students and British students who have a genuine interest in international affairs and intend to work as international journalists or foreign correspondents. It provides an opportunity for students to develop a critical understanding of the broader global political and economic environment from which major international news arises. Topics to be covered include international security and diplomacy, the impact of globalisation, the changing role of the UN, the expansion of NATO and the EU, the growing challenge of global terrorism, and news coverage of international conflict and major security issues. Students are taught by experienced journalists and recognised experts in international relations.

    The BA (Hons) International Journalism programme aims to provide an educational experience which facilitates the development of all students irrespective of race, gender, physical ability and sexual orientation. It seeks to produce graduates who have:

  • Specialist skills in print, radio, TV and online journalism with one of these developed to professional levels;
  • Practical journalistic and intellectual skills which enable them to communicate effectively through media technologies;
  • Research skills at degree level evidenced by a research dissertation;
  • An understanding of the theoretical and practical implications of global journalism practices and state-press relations in authoritarian, non-Western and/or non-liberal regimes as well as in democratic societies;
  • The capability to both initiate ideas and work as a member of a team;
  • A self-sufficiency and determination in presenting themselves for employment as staff or freelances in the journalism industry able to recognise a wider range of career routes open at national and international levels beyond the UK .This is a journalism degree course mixing the practical, vocational skills of the journalist with critical and reflective modules that help add depth and quality to your journalism. The course is designed in the expectation that you will become more self-reliant and independent, as you progress. You should be developing a range of transferable and professional skills as you progress from level to level. You will need to study and pass the modules described below, worth 120 credits each year. This will give you the 360 credits needed to be awarded an honours degree in International Journalism.Our graduates will have both the practical skills required by the journalism industry as well as a sound understanding of the complexity of world affairs and will therefore be well positioned to seek employment in a variety of international news organisations in the UK and other countries.
    .

    Programme Structure
    Year One:
    Introduction to News writing
    Introduction to reporting

    Semester One:
    Intro to International Journalism
    Approaches to Journalism
    Studying Journalism

    Semester Two:
    Intro to law and Ethics
    Intro to International Relations
    Elective

    .

    Modules

    Introduction to News Writing – To develop in students a thorough grasp of news-writing as required by local newspapers and other entry level media employers.

    Introduction to Reporting – A hands-on course covering everyday activities in the media. You will attend courts and council and learn how to interview and source a variety of types of story.

    Introduction to Shorthand – To develop the skill of shorthand as an aid to accurate note-taking.

    Approaches to Journalism – To introduce you to the news-oriented media in the UK and to help you evaluate how this is structured.

    Studying Journalism – To introduce you to understand methods of teaching and learning in Higher education to enable you to get the best from your studies whether that be lectures, seminars or private study.

    Introduction to Law and Ethics – This module will look at the philosophical issues underpinning the practice of journalism including objectivity, bias, truth and accuracy and how these are converted into laws and codes of ethics.

    Introduction to International Journalism – This module introduces to students specific characteristics of international approaches to journalism and to develop their knowledge and understanding of reporting on an international stage.

    Introduction to International Relations – This module provides students with a basic understanding of international affairs. It examines key developments in the global system with special reference to the economic, political and security dimensions of international relations.

    Intermediate Shorthand – To improve your speed at shorthand to aid the taking of accurate notes for reporting.

    .

    Year Two:
    International Law and Ethics

    Semester One:
    Public Relations (option)
    Academic research
    Cont International Relations
    Intro To TV

    Semester Two:
    Conflict, Terrorism and News Media
    Into to Online
    Intro to Radio
    Intro to Print Production

    .

    Modules

    Public Relations- To introduce you to the specialist skills used in public relations.

    Conflict, Terrorism and the News Media This module considers how news coverage of global conflict and terrorist events is shaped by a range of cultural, political and military factors. Special attention is paid to the coverage of ‘September 11′, the war on terrorism and the Iraq conflict in various parts of the world.

    International Law and Ethics – You will gain knowledge and understanding of human rights, media law and ethical practice that support journalism in a western-style democracy. You will be able to critically analyse media ethical and legal problems and present appropriate solutions

    Contemporary International Relations Building on the work in year one, this module looks at various issues in contemporary international relations in greater depth. It focuses on the significance of international law and diplomacy in world affairs as well as the nature and challenge of globalisation.

    Intro to Radio – To introduce you to practical radio journalism and techniques in studio and in location

    Online- To introduce you to the production process employed in electronic publishing, particularly on the world wide web, and to produce pages that are suitable for publication on a website.

    Introduction to TV – To introduce you to practical TV journalism and techniques in studio and in location.

    Print Production-To enable you to learn the principles and demonstrate the methods used in production journalism including the practice of sub-editing and design using industry-standard computer equipment.

    Academic Research – To introduce you to academic research, its methodologies and methods. To develop your understanding of the importance of designing meaningful research questions and investigating them with methods that attempt to be both valid and reliable.

    .

    Year Three
    Dissertation

    Semester One:
    Advanced Journalism Practice
    Issues in Global Security
    Advanced Writing Skills

    Semester Two:
    Journalism Final Project
    Journalism Regulation
    Cont Issues in Journalism

    .

    Modules

    Dissertation – To allow you to reflect on an aspect of the practice of journalism whilst developing your knowledge and appreciation of academic research methods and methodologies; to demonstrate an understanding of key theoretical, conceptual and methodological issues; to demonstrate an ability to apply these in research; to gather, synthesise and make use of relevant literature

    Advanced Journalism Practice – You will synthesise your skills of writing, reporting and production by building on previous practice in one discipline (radio, print, online or TV) in a newsroom environment to develop your creativity and ability to work within a team.

    Issues in Global Security – This module considers the importance of global security which has become increasingly relevant to the work of international journalists. It examines a range of security issues that affect global peace and stability, including military conflict, weapons of mass destruction, global terrorism, ethnic tension and so on.

    Advanced Writing Skills – To interrogate, analyse and practice advanced writing skills in journalism .

    Contemporary Issues in Journalism – To examine professional practices and ideologies, journalism in the public and private spheres and impacts of info technology on the journalism product.

    Journalism Regulation – You will be introduced to media regulation in the UK , Europe and the US . You will analyse and evaluate the performance of the UK regulatory bodies and public service and ownership regulation and consider the widening development of international regulation as well as consider other forms of regulation of the media.

    Journalism Final Project – To allow you to build on work in semester one of year three and at previous levels to advance your factual, news-oriented journalism in one particular subject discipline to approach or match professional standards. Includes a four-week of work placement.

    Applying for BA (hons) International Journalism

    International Journalism at LJMU is also popular and LJMU is still only one of a handful of universities to offer such a course at Undergraduate level in the UK.

    The International Journalism course aims to fit students to become journalists working in TV, radio, print or online. The course is structured so that students get a chance to try all four disciplines in the first two years, before specialising in year three. The course is taught in English and is structured around the British tradition of open journalism.

    Good English is required as it is not intended that this course will teach basic language skills. However, it is assumed that most students will be working in their second or even third language and this is taken into account in both the teaching and assessment.

    The course is a degree course and so provides more than just vocational training.

    Although it is expected that the majority of graduates will want to work in journalism, the course is structured to provide a strong liberal arts education.

    Students applying direct from school will normally be expected to have passed the equivalent of three A2 A-levels at at least grade C. Students on the course must be aged 18 or over.

    Students who have already studied an appropriate course are welcome to apply for direct entry to year two. Only students seeking to transfer from another journalism undergraduate programme would be considered for direct entry into year three.

    Mature students may not need formal qualifications, depending on their age and past history and should contact JMU direct .

    All applicants will be asked to write an essay and complete a general knowledge and current affairs quiz. Some may be asked to come for interview. for further information, please contact :

    Julie Quine – Admissions & Information Officer,

    School of Media,

    Critical & Creative Arts,

    Liverpool JMU

    MA Journalism

    This is a two-year part-time course in journalism, of interest to those working as a journalist or those with a serious interest in journalism.

    It is the intention of the Department of Journalism to launch this as a full-time one-year programme in September 2005. There will also be an International full-time route introduced at that time.

    The course is designed to develop the ability of students to critically analyse the purpose and structure of Journalism and to evaluate the processes and products of either their own or other people’s journalism. It is not intended to provide training to fit a student for work in the industry and students looking for such training courses are advised to consider LJMU’s BA journalism course, or the one-year diploma or post-graduate diploma courses in journalism run at other institutions.

    Entry criteria include a 2:1 undergraduate degree or appropriate alternative qualifications or experience.

    The course is modular, in line with JMU policy and the structure is outlined below:

    Part time Journalism

    .

    Year one:
    News and professional practice 20 credits

    Semester one:
    Journalism Studies 20 credits

    Semester two:
    Journalism History and Development 20 credits

    Year two:
    Dissertation 60 credits

    Reflections on Professional Practice 20 credits

    Semester one:
    Academic Research for Journalists 20 credits

    Semester two:
    Media Ethics and Human Rights 20 credits

    .

    Full-time Journalism

    .

    News and professional practice 20 credits
    Reflections on Professional Practice 20 credits

    Semester one:
    Journalism Studies 20 credits
    Academic Research for Journalists 20 credits

    Semester two:
    Journalism History and Development 20 credits
    Media Ethics and Human Rights 20 credits

    Semester three:
    Dissertation 60 credits

    .

    The modules will cover the following:

    News and Professional Practice

    This will examine news and explore why some events are newsworthy and others are not. It will examine why we are interested in gossip and discuss such concepts as “dumbing down”. It will also look at professional practice by examining the modern products of UK journalism and offer students the opportunity to reflect on their own journalism practice or the journalistic practice of others.

    Journalism Studies

    This will allow students to examine theories of audience, representation, media structure and regulation.

    Journalism History and Development

    This will look at the history and development of the news-oriented media, mainly in the UK.

    Academic Research for Journalists

    This will introduce students to academic research methods and allow them to develop the skills needed to undertake the dissertation.

    Media Ethics and Human Rights

    This will analyse and evaluate media ethics and how they are policed. It will start by looking at how these grow from our basic human rights and how journalistic ethics are inseparable from the democratic ideology and its links with human rights.

    Reflections on Professional Practice

    This module will give students an opportunity to analyse in depth the production and dissemination of news on a topical basis.

    Dissertation

    This is an extensive piece of individual work that will allow the student to research and examine in depth an aspect of journalism.

    MA International Journalism

    This is a one -year full -time course in journalism, of interest to those working as a journalist or those with a serious interest in journalism. It is particularly aimed at students from abroad seeking to study in the UK.

    Liverpool is one of Britain’s liveliest and most exciting cities and is due to be European city of Culture in 2008.

    The course is designed to develop the ability of students to critically analyse the purpose and structure of Journalism and to evaluate the processes and products of either their own or other people’s journalism. It is not intended to provide training to fit a student for work in the industry and students looking for such training courses are advised to consider LJMU’s BA journalism course, or the one-year diploma or post-graduate diploma courses in journalism run at other institutions.

    Entry criteria include a 2:1 undergraduate degree or appropriate alternative qualifications or experience.

    The course is modular, in line with JMU policy and the structure is outlined below:

    Full-time International Journalism

    .

    News and professional practice 20 credits
    International Relations 20 credits

    Semester one:
    Journalism Studies 20 credits
    Academic Research for Journalists 20 credits

    Semester two:
    Comparative Media Analysis 20 credits
    Media Ethics and Human Rights 20 credits

    Semester Three:
    Dissertation 60 credits

    .

    The modules will cover the following:

    News and Professional Practice

    This will examine news and explore why some events are newsworthy and others are not. It will examine why we are interested in gossip and discuss such concepts as “dumbing down”. It will also look at professional practice by examining the modern products of UK journalism and offer students the opportunity to reflect on their own journalism practice or the journalistic practice of others.

    Journalism Studies

    This will allow students to examine theories of audience, representation, media structure and regulation.

    Academic Research for Journalists

    This will introduce students to academic research methods and allow them to develop the skills needed to undertake the dissertation.

    Media Ethics and Human Rights

    This will analyse and evaluate media ethics and how they are policed. It will start by looking at how these grow from our basic human rights and how journalistic ethics are inseparable from the democratic ideology and its links with human rights.

    International Relations for Journalists

    This will examine international affairs and allow students to critically analyse the diplomatic, political and cultural structures that affect our security and international relations.

    Comparative Media Analysis

    Offers students an in-depth understanding of the media in an international context allowing the comparison of media in different cultures and the part ownership and structure play in the dissemination of news.

    Dissertation

    This is an extensive piece of individual work that will allow the student to research and examine in depth an aspect of journalism.

    Applicants for the Masters courses will normally have a good first degree, but those with alternative qualifications or suitable experience will also be considered.

    Applications for the masters programme at LJMU should be made to:

    Admissions Secretary: Amanda Greening

    Faculty of Media, Art and Social Science

    Dean Walters Building, St James St, Liverpool L1 7BR UK

    Tel: 0151 231 5029 fax: 0151 231 5049

    Email: mccamasters@livjm.ac.uk

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